Marguerite Cocktail

Difford's Guide
User Rating

Ingredients

Barware

Nick & Nora glass
Measuring jigger
Mixing glass
Bar spoon
Strainer

Flavour Profile

Gentle
Boozy
Sweet
Sour

Nutrition

There are approximately 145 calories in one serving of Marguerite Cocktail.

Times, Seasons & Occasions

Marguerite Cocktail image

Serve in a

Nick & Nora glass

Garnish:

Orange (or lemon) zest twist

How to make:

STIR all ingredients with ice and strain into chilled glass.

1 1/2 fl oz Rutte Dry Gin
1 1/2 fl oz Noilly Prat Extra Dry
1/24 fl oz Orange Curaçao liqueur
2 dash Orange bitters
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Our comment:

An equal parts (Fifty-Fifty) Dry Martini with a hint of orange due to the use of orange curaçao, orange bitters and an orange zest twist.

History:

Not to be confused with the much later, tequila-based Margarita, the Marguerite is a gin-based forerunner to the modern-day Dry Martini. The earliest known Marguerite Cocktail recipe appears in Harry Johnson's 1900 New and Improved Bartenders' Manual.

"Marguerite Cocktail
(Use a large bar glass)
Fill glass 3/4 full of fine-shaved ice;
2 or 3 dashes of orange bitters;
2 or 3 dashes of anisette;
1/2 wine glass of French vermouth;
1/2 wine glass of Plymouth gin;
Stir up well with a spoon, strain into a cocktail glass, putting in a cherry, squeeze piece of lemon peel on top and serve."


Then in his 1903 Bartenders Encyclopedia, Tim Daly omits the anisette in his recipe for the Marguerite:

"Marguerite Cocktail
Use a mixing glass.
Half fill with fine ice.
2 dashes of orange bitters.
1 dash of orange curacoa.[sic]
½ wine glass of French vermouth.
½ wine glass of Plymouth gin.
Stir well with spoon, strain into a cocktail glass, twist a piece of lemon peel on top, and serve."


The Marguerite, then turns drier and by the 1904 Stuart's Fancy Drinks, in a section headed "New And Up-To-Date Drinks" it becomes 2/3 Plymouth gin [a dry gin] to 1/3 French [dry] vermouth with a dash of orange bitters. Basically a modern-day 2:1 Dry Martini.

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