Cocktail Hall of Fame

C-D

Caipirinha image

Caipirinha

If you are European or in North America you're probably used to this drink being served with crushed ice, but until you have tried it with cubed ice you

Cameron's Kick image

Cameron's Kick

Faintly peaty honeyed whisky with a cleansing hint of lemon, rounded by almond.

Canchànchara image

Canchànchara

Your choice of honey and indeed rum will greatly affect the flavour, and indeed the success of the finished cocktail. More flavoursome honey demands a

Cantaritos image

Cantaritos

Juicy (freshly squeezed orange, grapefruit and lime) and refreshing slightly salty tequila invigorated with sparkling grapefruit soda. Wetting the porous

Casino (Savoy spec.) image

Casino (Savoy spec.)

Spirituous and a tad on the sour side. Basically, an Aviation without crème de violette, dried and made more complex with a dash of orange bitters.

Champagne Cocktail image

Champagne Cocktail

This classic cocktail remains as popular as ever. Starts bone dry and becomes slightly sweeter as you reach the dissolving cube at the bottom, depending

Champs-Elysees image

Champs-Elysees

A great after-dinner drink for lovers of cognac and Chartreuse.

Chanticleer Cocktail image

Chanticleer Cocktail

Clean, crisp, and fresh - gin-laced orange zesty citrus with herbal vermouth mellowed by smoothing egg white.

Chartreuse Swizzle image

Chartreuse Swizzle

A swizzle for people like me - Chartreuse lovers. Best enjoyed on a hot summer's evening.

Charlie Chaplin image

Charlie Chaplin

Dilution is key to this fruity bittersweet cocktail, hence the possible need to add some water depending on your ice.

Clover Club No.3 (Difford's recipe) image

Clover Club No.3 (Difford's recipe)

Easy drinking and creamy in texture – with notes of raspberry, gin, citrus and delicate spice.

Coronation No.1 image

Coronation No.1

Medium-dry and wonderfully aromatic with faint notes of almond from the fino sherry and delicately fruity maraschino. Delicious.

Corn'n'Oil Cocktail image

Corn'n'Oil Cocktail

Rum slightly sweetened and flavoured with the lime and clove flavours of falernum.

Corpse Reviver No.2 (Savoy Recipe) image

Corpse Reviver No.2 (Savoy Recipe)

Well-balanced with zesty lemon and absinthe just shining through. We've cheekily added the merest dash of sugar but depending on your personal tastes,

Cosmopolitan (Difford's recipe) image

Cosmopolitan (Difford's recipe)

The Cosmopolitan was originally made with citrus vodka but this recipe works just as well with unflavoured vodka, and when a good quality cranberry juice

Cuba Libre image

Cuba Libre

Basically a rum and coke with a squeeze of lime, but Cuba Libre has much more of a ring about it. And it is much more of a drink, the squeeze of lime and

Daiquiri 10:3:2 ratio (Difford’s) image

Daiquiri 10:3:2 ratio (Difford’s)

Crisp, light and refreshing. Delicately simple yet with perfectly balanced complexity of flavours. Grind white caster sugar in a mortar and pestle to

Daiquiri 6:2:1 ratio (popular) image

Daiquiri 6:2:1 ratio (popular)

This 6:2:1 (6 parts rum, 2 parts lime and 1 part sugar) Daiquiri recipe emerged after an afternoon's Daiquiri experimentation with five of the UK's most

Daiquiri 8:2:1 ratio (Embury's) image

Daiquiri 8:2:1 ratio (Embury's)

Traditionally a Daiquiri should always be based on light rum but if I should feel like breaking with tradition and using aged rum, I find Embury's 8:2:1

Daiquiri on-the-rocks image

Daiquiri on-the-rocks

Light and refreshing. No one flavour predominates - sweet and sour are in harmony with the rum.

Daiquiri (frozen) image

Daiquiri (frozen)

Blend with too much ice and you will have a tasteless slushy drink that will give you brain-ache if you drink it too fast. However, made correctly and

Daisy de Santiago image

Daisy de Santiago

Chartreuse adds subtle aromatics to this refreshing herbal Daiquiri/Daisy.

Dark 'n' Stormy (Difford’s recipe) image

Dark 'n' Stormy (Difford’s recipe)

A Daiquiri made with pungent dark rum, topped and made refreshing with spicy ginger beer. Part of the Mule family - but is distinctive due to the strong

De La Louisiane No.4 image

De La Louisiane No.4

A rye-based Sweet Manhattan made even sweeter with herbal Bénédictine liqueur and bittered with Peychaud's and absinthe. Originally made with equal

Death in the Afternoon image

Death in the Afternoon

Bravado (absinthe) dominates this drink, alongside hints of biscuity champagne. We added a touch of sugar to tame this hardman's cocktail.

Diamondback image

Diamondback

This potent cocktail marries apple spirit with rye whiskey and rich herbal Chartreuse. An after-dinner/nightcap tipple.

Dirty Banana image

Dirty Banana

Long, creamy and filling banana drink with a 'dirty' flavour and colour courtesy of coffee liqueur.

Dirty Martini image

Dirty Martini

This drink varies from delicious to disgusting, depending on what's making it Dirty. This is traditionally the liquid from a jar of olives and if using

Division Bell image

Division Bell

A mezcal inspired variation of the Last Word with a refreshing, spirit-forward blend of ingredients.

Dry Martini (1:1 ratio) “Fifty-Fifty” image

Dry Martini (1:1 ratio) “Fifty-Fifty”

A very 'wet' but wonderfully Dry Martini which demands an olive, not a twist. Before you start - Craddock calls for it to be shaken, but its better stirred.

Dry Martini (2:1.5 ratio) “Sopping Wet” image

Dry Martini (2:1.5 ratio) “Sopping Wet”

Herbal vermouth flavours pervade this Sopping Wet Martini.

Dry Martini (2:1 ratio) “Wet” image

Dry Martini (2:1 ratio) “Wet”

Reputed to be a favourite of HRH Prince Charles.

Dry Martini (3:1 ratio) image

Dry Martini (3:1 ratio)

Three to one may be unfair odds in a fight but vermouth shines in this stirred off-dry Martini. Through experimentation we have found that 3:1 Martinis

Dry Martini (4:1 ratio) image

Dry Martini (4:1 ratio)

A stirred four-to-one Martini is indeed a delicious thing. But is a five-to-one Martini even more delicious? Try both, and perhaps also a three-to-one.

Dry Martini (5:1 ratio) “Dickens” image

Dry Martini (5:1 ratio) “Dickens”

We have chosen a 5:1 ratio as our 'preferred' Dry Martini specification in deference to David Embury who writes of this drink in his The Fine Art of Mixing

Dry Martini (7:1 ratio) “Embury’s” image

Dry Martini (7:1 ratio) “Embury’s”

Readers of Embury will know he had a bone dry palate and Martinis made to his specification are just that, and with the correct dilution, fabulous.

Dry Martini (10:1 ratio) Difford’s preferred shaken image

Dry Martini (10:1 ratio) Difford’s preferred shaken

There's something about shaking a Dry Martini (as opposed to stirring a Martini) that amplifies the vermouth notes meaning that shaken Martinis need less

Dry Martini (15:1 ratio) “Montgomery’s” image

Dry Martini (15:1 ratio) “Montgomery’s”

Bone dry - a superbly cleansing Martini. Through experimentation we have found that 15:1 Martinis are better shaken rather than stirred. Conversely 3:1

Dry Martini (15:5 dumped) “Franklin” image

Dry Martini (15:5 dumped) “Franklin”

A Dry Martini named after Franklin Roosevelt and garnished with two olives.

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