Vodka Espresso / Espresso Martini

  • Vodka Espresso / Espresso Martini image 24039

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Likened to a vodka & Red Bull for the discerning, the caffeine loaded Espresso Martini consists of generous shots of vodka and espresso with coffee liqueur and a dash of sugar. Although not a true Martini, and these days often served in a coup rather than a V-shaped glass, the Espresso Martini is perhaps the best-known of contemporary classic cocktails to emerge from the 1990s.


Recipe


Like every cocktail, an Espresso Martini is only as good as its ingredients. So you'll need a decent vodka (we recommend Ketel One) and freshly made espresso coffee. The crema (creamy foam) on top of the coffee is key to the success and appearance of the finished cocktail. It may seem perverse to pour a steaming hot shot of espresso coffee into a shaker and then immediately shake with ice, rather than using cold/iced coffee, but let the coffee cool and so the crema die and you'll kill the cocktail. As with an espresso, the amount of sugar required to balance this cocktail is very much down to the tastes of the individual drinker but the ½ shot of coffee liqueur and ¼ shot of sugar used in our Espresso Martini recipe suits average palates.

Garnish


Espresso Martinis are usually garnished with three coffee beans arranged in a petal formation floating in the centre of the drinks creamy surface. The floating of three beans comes from the traditional serving of Sambuca in Italy where the three beans are called 'con la mosca', meaning "with the fly". The three beans represent health, wealth and happiness.

In addition to the three coffee beans I also like to express a lemon zest over the surface of the drink and then discard the zest (rather than use as a garnish). The lemon oils do negatively affect the foam but the lemony aroma adds considerably to the drink.

History / origins


The drink we know today as the Espresso Martini started life as the far more fittingly titled Vodka Espresso. Created in 1983 by Dick Bradsell at the Soho Brasserie, London for a customer who'd asked for a drink to "wake her up, and f@@k her up." When asked as to exactly why he settled on that drink that day, Dick told me: "The coffee machine at the Soho Brasserie was right next to the station where I served drinks. It was a nightmare, as there were coffee grounds everywhere, so coffee was very much on my mind. And it was all about vodka back then - it was all people were drinking."

Dick's original recipe called for vodka, sugar syrup, two types of coffee liqueur (Kahlua and Tia Maria) and freshly made espresso. As the eighties turned into the nineties people were still drinking vodka but this was the decade of the neo Martini - any cocktail served in a V-shaped glass and based on vodka was considered a 'Martini' and such neo Martinis were what bar goers ordered. Dick tweaked and re-christened his Vodka Espresso to the then more desirably named Espresso Martini. Finally, to complete his trilogy of coffee cocktails, in 1998 Dick renamed his creation Pharmaceutical Stimulant and served it on-the-rocks at the then newly opened Pharmacy in Notting Hill where Damian Hurst artwork hung and Dick was Bar Manager (the site is now a Waitrose store).

So Vodka Espresso, Espresso Martini and Pharmaceutical Stimulant are essentially the same drink which morphed over a couple of decades to suit the tastes of a changing audience and situation.

Variations


Cuppa Joe with hazelnut liqueur
Espresso Daiquiri with light white rum in place of vodka
Flying Frenchman an absinthe espresso martini
Irish Espresso'tini with Irish cream liqueur and vanilla vodka
Jalisco Espresso with tequila in place of vodka
Lotus Espresso with maple syrup in place of sugar
Mocha Martini with dark chocolate liqueur
Turkish Coffee Martini with cardamom

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